Move over brides-to-be, many men reckon wedding planning is more stressful for THEM

Almost a quarter of men find wedding planning more stressful than any other life event, new survey reveals

Many would argue that it's the bride-to-be that feels the most stress leading up to the big day.

Almost a quarter of men found their wedding the most stressful event in their lives [Rex] But today it's been revealed that men find planning for their wedding day more stressful than women do, with almost a quarter claiming their wedding was the most stressful thing they've ever done.

The big wedding stress overtook moving house or having a baby for 23 per cent of men according to a new study, compared to just 16 per cent of women.

Deciding who to put on the guest list was the root of men's anxiety, with nearly half of those polled revealing that choosing who to invite was the most difficult part of planning the whole occasion.

And with the cost of the average wedding today hitting tens of thousands of pounds, it should come as no surprise that keeping within budget was the second most stressful aspect of getting married.

Around 38 per cent said the financial worries of going over budget were keeping them awake at night, while trying to keep everyone happy in the run up to their big day worried 35 per cent of applicants.

Overbearing family members were also highlighted for creating more chaos than calm in the study, while interfering mother-in-laws were responsible for 23 per cent of the big day stress.
 
The stress over planning for a wedding overtook many other huge life events for many men [Rex] It seems all the stress caused by wedding planning had implications on their health and relationships, with a quarter admitting they lost valuable shut-eye as a result.

And around 18 per cent of the nation admitted the stress had caused them to argue with their partners, with women claiming they were prone to comfort eating and bursting into tears in the run up.

The new study, conducted by Kalms, discovered that Brits find moving house more stressful than having a baby, with 37 per cent saying the big move was the most challenging event of their lives.


Having a baby followed closely behind at 34 per cent, while financial worries were revealed as still being the root cause of much anxiety - with budget a significant stress trigger for over half of the population.

Other concerns included getting married (18 per cent) and changing jobs (11 per cent).

Sophia Davis, a leading transformational life coach, said the survey revealed today highlights the the real pressures people are under.
 
“Our society has massive fears surrounding money after what, for some, has seemed like a never-ending 'recession' and the results of the Kalms Annual Stress Report highlight the high levels of stress some people are under," she said.
 
“‎We have become increasingly aware of the security that seems to be connected to our homes because we are so afraid of loss, and have been made so aware of how many people have experienced it over recent years.
 
“A good friend, coach or counsellor can help you to regain perspective on your situation and allow you to restore your belief in yourself to overcome your challenges and turn them into opportunities. Herbal remedies can also help during times of stress.”

Top tips to deal with and avoid stress:
 
1.    Real security comes from knowing that you are capable of providing for your needs whatever situation arises so that wherever you are, and however often you move home or jobs, you take your security with you.
 
2.    Having a creative and open mind-set means you can adapt and find ways to make life work for us whatever it throws at you.
 
3.    Keeping a sense of calm and clarity in the mind, leaves room for solutions to be found and action to be taken.
 
4.    You are never given more in life than you can handle, it is important to move forward confidently with a positive mind-set and a great action plan.